PA Students – Burnouts & Wellness Programs

PA Student – Burnouts & Wellness Programs

Burnout is very common among physicians, residents, and medical students all over the world. However, very little is known about the burnout in physician assistant (PA) students. The burnout not only has adverse effects on mental and physical health, but it is also linked to medical errors, increased healthcare costs, and poor patient outcomes.

The PA workforce is a vital part of our healthcare industry; they extend the physicians’ services and ensure seamless healthcare services to patients. Studies reveal that PA students are also at risk of developing a high risk of burnout. This is not a good indication and can prove detrimental to the medical industry. It was found that PA students who are younger and in their clinical year of training or those who have children living at home suffered from a severe degree of burnout. Research studies indicate that the burnout observed in medical students with accompanying problems of high depression rate, suicidal ideation, and substance abuse can be very similar to PA students. As a result, this can cloud a student’s professional judgment and work efficiency. In a study, almost 80% of the PA students reported a high level of emotional exhaustion. There was a significant association between work hours and high emotional exhaustion. The prevalence of burnout varies across different specialties, i.e., those working in emergency medicine showed appeared to be at higher risk of burnout. The primary concern of about 90% of the PA students was the management of stress and burnout among the PA student population. So, the fact that these students identified burnout as a crucial problem to deal with indicates its importance and significance. Moreover, a large number of PA students expressed their willingness to participate in wellness programs designed to reduce burnout and manage stress. Burnout is very common among physicians, residents, and medical students all over the world. However, very little is known about the burnout in physician assistant (PA) students. The burnout not only has adverse effects on mental and physical health, but it is also linked to medical errors, increased healthcare costs, and poor patient outcomes.

The prevalence rate of burnout among PA students indicates that there should be an additional support program during PA training. Such assistive programs are vital if we are to tackle problems like burnout, stress, career regret, and poor career satisfaction – all of which adversely impact the healthcare ecosystem. More studies need to be conducted to understand the burnout pattern among PA students better and identify potential resources and interventions that may be able to help them coupe up. With adequate research and data, a highly tailored curriculum can be developed with will aid in work-life balance and provide vital stress management for PA students.