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Capillary hemangioma

Updated : March 12, 2024





Background

Hemangioma is the outcome of endothelial cell growth. Children’s capillary hemangioma is the highest prevalent benign ocular growth. They’ve been called a variety of names in the past, including juvenile hemangiomas, infantile hemangioma, strawberry nevi, and hemangioblastoma. The general terminology of capillaries hemangiomas is being used.

Epidemiology

The far more commonly diagnosed vascular malignancy of childhood is juvenile hemangiomas, which cause roughly four to five percent of newborns, the head and neck region accounts for eighty percent of all cases.

It’s caused by a cluster of abnormally tiny blood vessels that originates in the first year of life. In comparison to other ethnic categories, Caucasian babies are often more likely to have infantile hemangiomas. With a female to male ratio of up to 5:1, there is also a feminine superiority.

Anatomy

Pathophysiology

Capillary hemangioma natural course was first documented in the 19th century. Tiny flat bands of telangiectatic channels emerge.

  • Proliferative stage

Between the ages of three and twelve months, they go through dramatic growth. The endothelial cells divide and grow rapidly, giving rise to tube formation, and the tumors become nodules with crimson color, earning the name strawberry nevus.

  • Involutional stage

This stage is followed by voluntary involution of the tumors, which normally begins around the age of 3. Endothelial growth slows down, and fibrous tissue replaces the tumors.

Etiology

Hereditary factors have not been found to have a role in developing these neoplasms; however, they are uncommon among African races, according to various investigations. Prematurity and low birth weight are linked to an increased risk of certain neoplasms developing after delivery.

Genetics

Prognostic Factors

The prognosis for capillary hemangioma in children is excellent because these lesions usually involute spontaneously. Oral propranolol has a high response rate in large lesions, resulting in complete or near-total resolution.

Clinical History

Physical Examination

Age group

Associated comorbidity

Associated activity

Acuity of presentation

Differential Diagnoses

Laboratory Studies

Imaging Studies

Procedures

Histologic Findings

Staging

Treatment Paradigm

by Stage

by Modality

Chemotherapy

Radiation Therapy

Surgical Interventions

Hormone Therapy

Immunotherapy

Hyperthermia

Photodynamic Therapy

Stem Cell Transplant

Targeted Therapy

Palliative Care

Medication

Media Gallary

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538249/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538232/

Capillary hemangioma

Updated : March 12, 2024




Hemangioma is the outcome of endothelial cell growth. Children’s capillary hemangioma is the highest prevalent benign ocular growth. They’ve been called a variety of names in the past, including juvenile hemangiomas, infantile hemangioma, strawberry nevi, and hemangioblastoma. The general terminology of capillaries hemangiomas is being used.

The far more commonly diagnosed vascular malignancy of childhood is juvenile hemangiomas, which cause roughly four to five percent of newborns, the head and neck region accounts for eighty percent of all cases.

It’s caused by a cluster of abnormally tiny blood vessels that originates in the first year of life. In comparison to other ethnic categories, Caucasian babies are often more likely to have infantile hemangiomas. With a female to male ratio of up to 5:1, there is also a feminine superiority.

Capillary hemangioma natural course was first documented in the 19th century. Tiny flat bands of telangiectatic channels emerge.

  • Proliferative stage

Between the ages of three and twelve months, they go through dramatic growth. The endothelial cells divide and grow rapidly, giving rise to tube formation, and the tumors become nodules with crimson color, earning the name strawberry nevus.

  • Involutional stage

This stage is followed by voluntary involution of the tumors, which normally begins around the age of 3. Endothelial growth slows down, and fibrous tissue replaces the tumors.

Hereditary factors have not been found to have a role in developing these neoplasms; however, they are uncommon among African races, according to various investigations. Prematurity and low birth weight are linked to an increased risk of certain neoplasms developing after delivery.

The prognosis for capillary hemangioma in children is excellent because these lesions usually involute spontaneously. Oral propranolol has a high response rate in large lesions, resulting in complete or near-total resolution.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538249/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK538232/