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Tinea Cruris

Updated : February 28, 2024





Background

Tinea cruris often referred to as jock itch, is a skin infection that affects the vaginal, pubic, perineal, and perianal areas and is brought on by fungus of arthrodermataceae (dermatophytes), which are infective fungi.

Many arthrodermataceae cause a distinctive rash by affecting keratinized tissues including the stratum corneum of the epidermis and keratinized tissues like hair.

Maceration, Sweating, and the groin’s alkaline pH make intertriginous regions conducive to the growth of fungus. These factors contribute to the groin’s propensity for infestation.

While tinea illnesses are frequently categorized by the part of the body that is infected, diseases are also arranged in accordance with the major source and route of transmission of the causing organism.

Fungi that are zoophilic, anthropophilic, and geophilic are discovered in and spread by animals, soil, and people, accordingly. Additionally feasible and critical in jock itch due to the possibility of foot-to-groin transfer, autoinfection of arthrodermataceae is necessary.

Epidemiology

Twenty to twenty-five percent of people worldwide are affected by dermal mycoses, such as jock itch. Due to the high-temperature conditions and increasing humidity, dermatophyte diseases are more common in tropical and emerging regions.

About fifty million documented doctor visits and approximately 29.4 million occurrences of surface-level fungal diseases have occurred in the US.

Adults and male adolescents make up the bulk of people with jock itch and are more likely to have the condition. The finding of recalcitrant illnesses and an increase in dermatophytes around the globe have raised concerns.

Anatomy

Pathophysiology

The organism utilizes proteinases to break down the keratin deposited in the stratum corneum of the skin, which is a simplification of the complicated and poorly understood pathogenesis of arthrodermataceae.

Etiology

Dermatophytes from the 3 genera Microsporum, Trichophyton, and Epidermophyton are the culprits behind tinea cruris. Despite the fact that Trichophyton rubrum has already been separated the most frequently and continues to be the most prevalent cause of jock itch globally, most investigations do note the rising frequency of Trichophyton mentagrophytes as well as other organisms in some areas.

Tinea cruris is caused by a number of risk factors, such as excessive sweating, obstructive clothes, diabetes mellitus, poor hygiene, immunocompromise, and economically disadvantaged level. Athletes may be more susceptible to tinea infestations, specifically those who play direct contact games.

A patient’s genetic makeup may potentially increase their susceptibility to dermatophytes. Perspiration seems to have the greatest impact on the spread of infection of all these elements.

A study was carried out in India, a region where dermatophytes are disproportionately prevalent, in response to the rising incidence and declining clinical efficacy of regional tinea infestations. It was discovered that having diabetes mellitus, family and friends having tinea, and having a history of preparing food were all positively correlated with having a chronic and recurrent illness.

Genetics

Prognostic Factors

When sufferers with tinea cruris receive the proper care, healing rates for the condition range from eighty to ninety percent.

Clinical History

Physical Examination

Age group

Associated comorbidity

Associated activity

Acuity of presentation

Differential Diagnoses

Laboratory Studies

Imaging Studies

Procedures

Histologic Findings

Staging

Treatment Paradigm

by Stage

by Modality

Chemotherapy

Radiation Therapy

Surgical Interventions

Hormone Therapy

Immunotherapy

Hyperthermia

Photodynamic Therapy

Stem Cell Transplant

Targeted Therapy

Palliative Care

Medication

 

ciclopirox 

Apply the product onto clean & dry skin twice daily
Gently massage over the areas affected
If no improvement is seen after weeks, re-diagnose



luliconazole 

To treat the affected area and the surrounding 1-inch region(s), apply cream once daily for one week



terbinafine topical 

Apply once daily for a duration of one week, not exceeding four weeks



haloprogin 

Apply the cream on the affected area two times a day for 2-3 weeks



haloprogin 

Apply the cream on the affected area two times a day for 2-3 weeks



betamethasone/clotrimazole 

Cream: Apply every 12hr to infected area for 1 week; after 1 week if there is no improvement; do not exceed more than 45g per week; for maximum of 2 weeks
Lotion: Apply every 12hr to infected area for 1 week; after 1 week if there is no improvement; do not exceed more than 45 g per week; for maximum of 2 weeks



 

ciclopirox 

For >12 years, refer to adult indications



luliconazole 

Age 12-18 years: Apply the cream onto the affected area and approximately one inch of the surrounding area(s) once daily for seven days



 

Media Gallary

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK554602/

Tinea Cruris

Updated : February 28, 2024




Tinea cruris often referred to as jock itch, is a skin infection that affects the vaginal, pubic, perineal, and perianal areas and is brought on by fungus of arthrodermataceae (dermatophytes), which are infective fungi.

Many arthrodermataceae cause a distinctive rash by affecting keratinized tissues including the stratum corneum of the epidermis and keratinized tissues like hair.

Maceration, Sweating, and the groin’s alkaline pH make intertriginous regions conducive to the growth of fungus. These factors contribute to the groin’s propensity for infestation.

While tinea illnesses are frequently categorized by the part of the body that is infected, diseases are also arranged in accordance with the major source and route of transmission of the causing organism.

Fungi that are zoophilic, anthropophilic, and geophilic are discovered in and spread by animals, soil, and people, accordingly. Additionally feasible and critical in jock itch due to the possibility of foot-to-groin transfer, autoinfection of arthrodermataceae is necessary.

Twenty to twenty-five percent of people worldwide are affected by dermal mycoses, such as jock itch. Due to the high-temperature conditions and increasing humidity, dermatophyte diseases are more common in tropical and emerging regions.

About fifty million documented doctor visits and approximately 29.4 million occurrences of surface-level fungal diseases have occurred in the US.

Adults and male adolescents make up the bulk of people with jock itch and are more likely to have the condition. The finding of recalcitrant illnesses and an increase in dermatophytes around the globe have raised concerns.

The organism utilizes proteinases to break down the keratin deposited in the stratum corneum of the skin, which is a simplification of the complicated and poorly understood pathogenesis of arthrodermataceae.

Dermatophytes from the 3 genera Microsporum, Trichophyton, and Epidermophyton are the culprits behind tinea cruris. Despite the fact that Trichophyton rubrum has already been separated the most frequently and continues to be the most prevalent cause of jock itch globally, most investigations do note the rising frequency of Trichophyton mentagrophytes as well as other organisms in some areas.

Tinea cruris is caused by a number of risk factors, such as excessive sweating, obstructive clothes, diabetes mellitus, poor hygiene, immunocompromise, and economically disadvantaged level. Athletes may be more susceptible to tinea infestations, specifically those who play direct contact games.

A patient’s genetic makeup may potentially increase their susceptibility to dermatophytes. Perspiration seems to have the greatest impact on the spread of infection of all these elements.

A study was carried out in India, a region where dermatophytes are disproportionately prevalent, in response to the rising incidence and declining clinical efficacy of regional tinea infestations. It was discovered that having diabetes mellitus, family and friends having tinea, and having a history of preparing food were all positively correlated with having a chronic and recurrent illness.

When sufferers with tinea cruris receive the proper care, healing rates for the condition range from eighty to ninety percent.

ciclopirox 

Apply the product onto clean & dry skin twice daily
Gently massage over the areas affected
If no improvement is seen after weeks, re-diagnose



luliconazole 

To treat the affected area and the surrounding 1-inch region(s), apply cream once daily for one week



terbinafine topical 

Apply once daily for a duration of one week, not exceeding four weeks



haloprogin 

Apply the cream on the affected area two times a day for 2-3 weeks



haloprogin 

Apply the cream on the affected area two times a day for 2-3 weeks



betamethasone/clotrimazole 

Cream: Apply every 12hr to infected area for 1 week; after 1 week if there is no improvement; do not exceed more than 45g per week; for maximum of 2 weeks
Lotion: Apply every 12hr to infected area for 1 week; after 1 week if there is no improvement; do not exceed more than 45 g per week; for maximum of 2 weeks



ciclopirox 

For >12 years, refer to adult indications



luliconazole 

Age 12-18 years: Apply the cream onto the affected area and approximately one inch of the surrounding area(s) once daily for seven days



https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK554602/