fbpx

Tinea versicolor

Updated : February 27, 2024





Background

Pityriasis versicolor, often referred to as tinea versicolor, is a common, superficial, benign fungal skin illness. It is one of the disorders associated to Malassezia. Pityriasis versicolor is characterized by hyperpigmented or hypopigmented, coarsely scaly macules.

The most common sites of infection are the neck, trunk, and the proximal extremities. Generally, pityriasis versicolor is diagnosed solely on clinical grounds.

In dubious circumstances, UV black light and microscopic analysis of scales immersed in potassium hydroxide is useful. Although Pityriasis versicolor is very responsive to induction treatment, long-term maintenance is necessary, due to its high rate of recurrence.

Epidemiology

This condition has been documented all over the world, but it is especially prevalent in humid and warm climates. The incidence is as considerable as 50% in tropical areas and as minimal as 1.1% in cold countries like Sweden.

Teenagers and young adults are more likely to develop Pityriasis versicolor due to increased sebum production in the sebaceous glands, which provides Malassezia with an ideal lipid-rich environment.

All ethnicities are equally affected by pityriasis versicolor, and no gender-related predominance has been identified.

Anatomy

Pathophysiology

Malassezia is an indicator of healthy skin, and it is particularly prevalent in oily regions like the back, the face, and the scalp. Malassezia can only cause tinea versicolor when it transforms into its pathogenic filamentous form.

The factors which contribute to this conversion of malassezia are:

  • Humidity and heat
  • Weak immune status
  • Oily skin
  • Use of oily creams and lotions
  • Pregnancy

Etiology

Pityriasis versicolor is caused by Malassezia, a dimorphic lipophilic fungus. It is a typical component of the skin flora. A total of 14 Malassezia species have been identified until now.

There are three primary Malassezia species isolated from pityriasis versicolor: Malassezia globosa, Malassezia sympodialis, and Malassezia furfur.

Genetics

Prognostic Factors

Pityriasis versicolor is noncontagious and benign since the causal fungus is a fundamental component of healthy skin. Topical and oral antifungal medications are beneficial — but the illness has a significant recurrence rate, which inadvertently affects the quality of life of the patient.

So, preventive actions need to be implemented. Additionally, patients must be informed that pigmentary changes could persist for weeks to months after the fungus has been eliminated.

Clinical History

Physical Examination

Age group

Associated comorbidity

Associated activity

Acuity of presentation

Differential Diagnoses

Laboratory Studies

Imaging Studies

Procedures

Histologic Findings

Staging

Treatment Paradigm

by Stage

by Modality

Chemotherapy

Radiation Therapy

Surgical Interventions

Hormone Therapy

Immunotherapy

Hyperthermia

Photodynamic Therapy

Stem Cell Transplant

Targeted Therapy

Palliative Care

Medication

 

butenafine 

Apply onto the affected skin area each day for 2 weeks



 
 

Media Gallary

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482500/

Tinea versicolor

Updated : February 27, 2024




Pityriasis versicolor, often referred to as tinea versicolor, is a common, superficial, benign fungal skin illness. It is one of the disorders associated to Malassezia. Pityriasis versicolor is characterized by hyperpigmented or hypopigmented, coarsely scaly macules.

The most common sites of infection are the neck, trunk, and the proximal extremities. Generally, pityriasis versicolor is diagnosed solely on clinical grounds.

In dubious circumstances, UV black light and microscopic analysis of scales immersed in potassium hydroxide is useful. Although Pityriasis versicolor is very responsive to induction treatment, long-term maintenance is necessary, due to its high rate of recurrence.

This condition has been documented all over the world, but it is especially prevalent in humid and warm climates. The incidence is as considerable as 50% in tropical areas and as minimal as 1.1% in cold countries like Sweden.

Teenagers and young adults are more likely to develop Pityriasis versicolor due to increased sebum production in the sebaceous glands, which provides Malassezia with an ideal lipid-rich environment.

All ethnicities are equally affected by pityriasis versicolor, and no gender-related predominance has been identified.

Malassezia is an indicator of healthy skin, and it is particularly prevalent in oily regions like the back, the face, and the scalp. Malassezia can only cause tinea versicolor when it transforms into its pathogenic filamentous form.

The factors which contribute to this conversion of malassezia are:

  • Humidity and heat
  • Weak immune status
  • Oily skin
  • Use of oily creams and lotions
  • Pregnancy

Pityriasis versicolor is caused by Malassezia, a dimorphic lipophilic fungus. It is a typical component of the skin flora. A total of 14 Malassezia species have been identified until now.

There are three primary Malassezia species isolated from pityriasis versicolor: Malassezia globosa, Malassezia sympodialis, and Malassezia furfur.

Pityriasis versicolor is noncontagious and benign since the causal fungus is a fundamental component of healthy skin. Topical and oral antifungal medications are beneficial — but the illness has a significant recurrence rate, which inadvertently affects the quality of life of the patient.

So, preventive actions need to be implemented. Additionally, patients must be informed that pigmentary changes could persist for weeks to months after the fungus has been eliminated.

butenafine 

Apply onto the affected skin area each day for 2 weeks



https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482500/