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Colorectal Cancer Will Be Responsible For 52,000 Americans This Year, Says New Study - medtigo

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Colorectal Cancer Will Be Responsible For 52,000 Americans This Year, Says New Study

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As the globe strives to reclaim some normalcy following the COVID-19 epidemic, physicians advise that health checkups, particularly for cancer, be prioritized, as a new study by the American Cancer Society gives alarming data. According to the survey, Colorectal Cancer will be responsible for 52,000 Americans this year.

“In the United States, colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death,” said Dr. Michael Barry, vice-chair of the US Preventive Services Task Force, a body of national experts in disease prevention and evidence-based medicine.

“We now know that colorectal cancer screening is effective and saves lives, which is a positive factor,” Barry added.

Doctors are attempting to promote awareness that adults in their 40s should be examined. Fortunately, there are several strategies to lower your risk of colon cancer, including knowing when to get read.

According to the USPSTF, the most appropriate solution to lower your risk of colon cancer is to get checked regularly beginning at age 45, ABC News reports.

More people can be checked for colorectal cancer due to enhanced screening standards, saving countless lives. Several testing choices are available; some are conducted once a year and others once every ten years. Doctors and patients should collaborate to choose which screening option is appropriate for them.

Dr. Madhu Vennikandam, a gastroenterology fellow at Sparrow Hospital, explains, “Colonoscopies help discover polyps or precancerous growths as well as potentially give therapy via excision at the same time.”

According to doctors, knowing whether your mother’s or father’s side of the family has a history of colon cancer is critical. If there is a family history of cancer, you should start screening at 40 years old or ten years before the youngest first-degree relative is afflicted, says an ABC News report.

“People with any signs or symptoms of colorectal cancer, polyps, or a personal or family history of genetic diseases should communicate with their doctors to ensure that they get the remedy they require,” Barry says.

Medical professionals advise consuming more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains while avoiding beef, pork, and processed meat.

Tobacco products include at least 70 compounds that can cause cancer. Current smokers are expected to have a 48 percent greater risk of colon cancer than persons who never smoke, according to a study published in the Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology journal.

Obesity (defined as a BMI of 30 or more) has been related to an increased risk of 13 malignancies, including colorectal cancer. The most frequent obesity-related malignancy in males is colorectal cancer. As per the experts, doing 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to intense physical activity each day may help reduce the risk of developing the disease.

“We now know that colorectal cancer screening is effective and saves lives, which is a beneficial move. Consult a doctor about this potentially life-saving test if you’re 45 or older,” Barry remarked.

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