fbpx

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Aggressive Behavior

Updated : September 6, 2023





Background

Aggressive behavior is a sign of several psychiatric conditions. It can occur at any age, from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents to domestic violence in adulthood to dementia in older persons.

It is the visible expression of anger and is frequently related to behavioral transitions and various medical and psychiatric disorders.

Epidemiology

The homicide rate in the United States is 7.5 times that of the other high-income countries combined, owing partly to a 25-fold increase in firearm homicides.

According to the 2013 Unified Crime Data, an estimated 1,163,146 violent felonies were committed in the United States. Additionally, every 9 seconds, a woman is beaten.

Approximately 20 individuals per minute are physically abused by their partners. Annually, about 16,000 killings and 1.6 million assault injuries require medical attention.

Anatomy

Pathophysiology

Aggressive behavior can be influenced by genetics in a diverse array. The most influential factor of violence is the male gender. Males are often considered perpetrators of violence due to testosterone or social pressures. This is evident in prison populations. Specific individuals have a congenital deficit in an allele for monoamine oxidase, which upregulates serotonin. It could lead to a rise in serotonin, and excessive serotonin has been related to aggression, particularly in people residing in a stressful socioeconomic context.

Violence has been exhibited in epileptic patients, especially individuals whose seizures originate in the frontal or temporal lobes. In circumstances of respiratory distress, patients with asthma or COPD develop aggressiveness. Pain is the most important medical condition that provokes aggressiveness. The person frequently acts in response to the excruciating suffering, regardless of its physical cause. Due to its ability to lower the repressive boundaries of previously controlled emotions, particularly anger, alcohol frequently contributes to violence.

Mescaline, ecstasy, peyote, and LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) are hallucinogens that can cause terrifying, overpowering, and unsettling experiences that lead to aggressive conduct. PCP (Phencyclidine), often referred to as angel dust, not just gives the user a supernatural sense of well-being and makes them pain-impervious. Still, it can also lead to solid and aggressive tendencies. PCP users have perpetrated homicides. Additionally, anabolic steroids, frequently used for physical improvement, can lead to violent outbursts.

Etiology

The prefrontal cortex is responsible for the central nervous system’s executive function. Violent aggressiveness is linked to decreased prefrontal cortex activity in the medial and orbitofrontal regions. The natural inhibitions can be removed by lesions or neural abnormalities, such as Alzheimer’s disease, leading to unregulated aggressive behavior.

Violence is more likely to occur when the prefrontal cortex is less engaged and the amygdala is overactive. While addressing the causes of aggression, biological, psychological, and socioeconomic factors must be considered. Physical and mental illnesses, genetics, neurotransmitters, illicit drugs, hormones, and pharmaceuticals are a few examples of biological reasons.

These include schizophrenia, antisocial personality disorder, major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. Interpersonal, neighborhood, social, group, economic, and cultural factors can lead to or cause violence. These factors are referred to as socioeconomic reasons. Significantly, these influences frequently interact.

Genetics

Prognostic Factors

Clinical History

Physical Examination

Age group

Associated comorbidity

Associated activity

Acuity of presentation

Differential Diagnoses

Laboratory Studies

Imaging Studies

Procedures

Histologic Findings

Staging

Treatment Paradigm

by Stage

by Modality

Chemotherapy

Radiation Therapy

Surgical Interventions

Hormone Therapy

Immunotherapy

Hyperthermia

Photodynamic Therapy

Stem Cell Transplant

Targeted Therapy

Palliative Care

Medication

Media Gallary

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK448073/

ADVERTISEMENT 

Aggressive Behavior

Updated : September 6, 2023




Aggressive behavior is a sign of several psychiatric conditions. It can occur at any age, from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents to domestic violence in adulthood to dementia in older persons.

It is the visible expression of anger and is frequently related to behavioral transitions and various medical and psychiatric disorders.

The homicide rate in the United States is 7.5 times that of the other high-income countries combined, owing partly to a 25-fold increase in firearm homicides.

According to the 2013 Unified Crime Data, an estimated 1,163,146 violent felonies were committed in the United States. Additionally, every 9 seconds, a woman is beaten.

Approximately 20 individuals per minute are physically abused by their partners. Annually, about 16,000 killings and 1.6 million assault injuries require medical attention.

Aggressive behavior can be influenced by genetics in a diverse array. The most influential factor of violence is the male gender. Males are often considered perpetrators of violence due to testosterone or social pressures. This is evident in prison populations. Specific individuals have a congenital deficit in an allele for monoamine oxidase, which upregulates serotonin. It could lead to a rise in serotonin, and excessive serotonin has been related to aggression, particularly in people residing in a stressful socioeconomic context.

Violence has been exhibited in epileptic patients, especially individuals whose seizures originate in the frontal or temporal lobes. In circumstances of respiratory distress, patients with asthma or COPD develop aggressiveness. Pain is the most important medical condition that provokes aggressiveness. The person frequently acts in response to the excruciating suffering, regardless of its physical cause. Due to its ability to lower the repressive boundaries of previously controlled emotions, particularly anger, alcohol frequently contributes to violence.

Mescaline, ecstasy, peyote, and LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) are hallucinogens that can cause terrifying, overpowering, and unsettling experiences that lead to aggressive conduct. PCP (Phencyclidine), often referred to as angel dust, not just gives the user a supernatural sense of well-being and makes them pain-impervious. Still, it can also lead to solid and aggressive tendencies. PCP users have perpetrated homicides. Additionally, anabolic steroids, frequently used for physical improvement, can lead to violent outbursts.

The prefrontal cortex is responsible for the central nervous system’s executive function. Violent aggressiveness is linked to decreased prefrontal cortex activity in the medial and orbitofrontal regions. The natural inhibitions can be removed by lesions or neural abnormalities, such as Alzheimer’s disease, leading to unregulated aggressive behavior.

Violence is more likely to occur when the prefrontal cortex is less engaged and the amygdala is overactive. While addressing the causes of aggression, biological, psychological, and socioeconomic factors must be considered. Physical and mental illnesses, genetics, neurotransmitters, illicit drugs, hormones, and pharmaceuticals are a few examples of biological reasons.

These include schizophrenia, antisocial personality disorder, major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. Interpersonal, neighborhood, social, group, economic, and cultural factors can lead to or cause violence. These factors are referred to as socioeconomic reasons. Significantly, these influences frequently interact.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK448073/

Free CME credits

Both our subscription plans include Free CME/CPD AMA PRA Category 1 credits.

Digital Certificate PDF

On course completion, you will receive a full-sized presentation quality digital certificate.

medtigo Simulation

A dynamic medical simulation platform designed to train healthcare professionals and students to effectively run code situations through an immersive hands-on experience in a live, interactive 3D environment.

medtigo Points

medtigo points is our unique point redemption system created to award users for interacting on our site. These points can be redeemed for special discounts on the medtigo marketplace as well as towards the membership cost itself.
 
  • Registration with medtigo = 10 points
  • 1 visit to medtigo’s website = 1 point
  • Interacting with medtigo posts (through comments/clinical cases etc.) = 5 points
  • Attempting a game = 1 point
  • Community Forum post/reply = 5 points

    *Redemption of points can occur only through the medtigo marketplace, courses, or simulation system. Money will not be credited to your bank account. 10 points = $1.

All Your Certificates in One Place

When you have your licenses, certificates and CMEs in one place, it's easier to track your career growth. You can easily share these with hospitals as well, using your medtigo app.

Our Certificate Courses